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Top Health Tips from Health Industry Experts

It can be difficult to motivate yourself to make healthy changes and kick start those mindful habits. Maybe you don’t know where to start. Or perhaps you’ve adjusted certain aspects of your lifestyle, but aren’t seeing any results.

Even with the best intentions, you need a solid plan in place to make the most of your efforts, and you don’t have to work everything out the hard way.

You know you need to eat healthy and exercise to meet your weight loss and fitness goals. Getting all the nutrients and vitamins you need in a day is essential. And exercising is just as important as rest and relaxation.

We want to help you help yourself. So we asked trusted and experienced health and well-being experts for their top health tips for leading a natural, vigorous life.

We have nutrition advice from top nutritionists and fitness advice from the finest trainers. Not to mention strategies to help you stick to your goals from people who have been where you are.

Find out more about our health expert contributors.


Fitness & well-being
Nutrition
Sleep
Mental Health
Achieve your goals

Fitness & well-being

01 Get moving!

 
Get moving fitness tip
 
We need to move. Exercise not only helps us to look and feel good, but it also helps to prevent pain and injuries. Try to move your body for at least 15 minutes a day, walking with your baby at morning nap time or swapping the car for your legs to take the kids to school are ways to increase daily activity.

Lorraine Scapens Pre and Postnatal Exercise & Wellness Coach

02 Stick with small, frequent movements

 
Stick with small, frequent movements
 
Small and frequent movement is more important than putting in one big effort then sitting on your butt all day.

Sunniva Holt Author at The Daily Raw, blog about high raw lifestyle

Today - just do a 2 minute workout! Moving your body is an incredible thing, but it doesn't need to be time consuming. 2 minutes is enough to get that heart racing. So do a quick 2 minute workout it in the morning, during natural breaks in the day, or while watching telly. Planking is one of my favorites because it's amazing for your core. Do 30 secs 4 times, or hold it the full 2 minutes if you're really advanced! I do mine when I'm walking down the beach.

Dani Stevens 365 Lifestyle Motivator

You can start exercising at any point when you feel ready, light walking is a nice way to start....and try the one day on one day off method so every second day is a rest day.

Millie Elder-Holmes Lifestyle Blogger at Clean Eatz NZ

03Fast workout for fast result

 
Fast workout for fast result
 

If you’re short on time but still want the results and energized feeling that a killer workout gives you, my go to is tabata training.

This high intensity interval training (HIIT) cardio and strength workout is based on Tabata protocol, created by Dr. Izumi Tabata at the National Institute of Fitness and Sports in Tokyo, Japan. The gist: Four minutes of near max exertion effort which consists of 8 rounds of 20 seconds maximal effort + 10 seconds rest. As legend (and science) has it, those four minutes are worth the equivalent of an hour of steady. Round 1: Jumping Squats (8 sets of 20 second intense effort + 10 seconds rest). Round 2: Knee Push-Ups (8 sets of 20 second intense effort + 10 seconds rest). Round 3: Mountain Climbers (8 sets of 20 second intense effort + 10 seconds rest). Round 4: Triceps dips (8 sets of 20 second intense effort + 10 seconds rest). Record each rounds and compare each week to see improvements. Download a tabata app so the timer automatically goes off for you. Do the routine below once, resting for one minute between each round.

There's so many options you could do with tabata training - ie Skipping, lunges, burpees, sit ups, squats, overhead push press, box jumps, step ups, high knees, tricep push-ups etc. Only rest 2 minutes max between each rounds before beginning the next movement.

Lee Sutherland Professional Health and Nutritional Coach

With your exercise program best results will come through strength training and short intense cardio sessions. Strength training creates lean dense muscles so you burn more calories at rest and use energy more efficiently. As you get older your bones will also reap the benefits. Short intense cardio sessions burn more energy and increase your overall fitness level. Choose 20 mins of sprint training over a 60 min run.

Hayley Roper Professional Trainer and Director at Love My Body

04Only do exercise you enjoy

 
Only do exercise you enjoy
 
Find a style of exercise you love, you don't have to be out pounding the pavement everyday or stuck inside a gym unless you enjoy those things. Try a HIIT class, bootcamp, swimming, cycling etc until you find something that really suits YOU. If you don't truly enjoy it, you aren't likely to stick with it in the long term.

Amanda Personal Trainer and Author at Move Love Eat

People who love to exercise don't waste time with activities they despise. Start with an activity that you're interested in or already enjoy -- it doesn't have to be what your neighbour said helped her lose weight, or what the group-class trend of the moment is. What matters is that you like it. If you don't want to do it, you will make an excuse to skip it tonight (and tomorrow, and the next day).

Lee-Anne Wann Health & Fitness Consultant

05Schedule your exercise

 
Schedule your exercise
 

Schedule in your workouts as though they are appointments with your boss, you wouldn’t cancel on your boss, so don’t cancel on yourself!

Amanda Personal Trainer and Author at Move Love Eat

06Reward yourself

 
Reward yourself
 

Your goal is to make exercise an automatic habit that you don't have to agonize over. A way to reinforce the routine is to reward yourself for a job well done. A great idea is to set up a checking account that you deposit a set amount of money into each week when you successfully stick to your fitness or health goals. And every time you miss them? You withdraw the money. At the end of the month, take the money and do something fun.

Lee-Anne Wann Health & Fitness Consultant

07Practice ‘Ahimsa’

 
Practise Ahimsa
 

Always work with rather than against your energy – listening to the needs of your body and emotions, which change all the time during our month and over the years. If you practice yoga regularly at home rather than always attending classes, you're likely to be much more tuned into the unique needs of your body-mind which will support your health and well-being.

Ana Davis Director and Founder of Bliss Baby Yoga

08Take a breath

 
Take a breath
 
Practise deep belly breathing as soon as you wake. Place your hands on your belly and as you inhale, feel your belly rise. As you exhale, feel your belly fall. Do this 10 times. This helps to activate your parasympathetic or ‘rest, digest and reproduce’ arm of your nervous system, which will promote optimal hormone balance, health and energy throughout the day.

Kate Callaghan Holistic nutritionist and personal trainer

Meditate and get enough sleep. High Cortisol has many negative effects on your health and also makes it impossible to lose weight. By keeping your cortisol down you will keep your body fat down.

Hayley Roper Professional Trainer and Director at Love My Body

09Catch some sunshine

 
Catch some sunshine
 

Get adequate sunlight! Regular time spent in the sun helps maintain optimal amounts of Vitamin D. The sun is far more effective than any supplement when it comes to manufacturing Vitamin D and Vitamin D manufactured by the sun is stored longer in your body too!

Vitamin D is important because it governs the production of cholesterol as well as regulates cell growth. There is a widespread deficiency of Vitamin D – so make sure you get your time in the sun!

Elora Harré Wellness and Lifestyle Blogger

10Follow your life cycle

 
Follow your life cycle
 
Adjust your yoga practice to suit whatever stage you are at in your life. For example, if you're pregnant you'll need to practice safe, appropriate prenatal yoga, or if you are trying to conceive you're best off practising fertility-focussed yoga. And, if you're moving into the big 'M' - menopause - you'll need to adapt your practice to suit your changing physical and emotional energy.

Ana Davis Director and Founder of Bliss Baby Yoga

Nutrition

11Create a rainbow plate

 

Focus on colours, not calories. Calorie counting is no good for anyone. It can make you even more stressed and obsessive about your food choices, neither of which is good for your optimal well-being.

Instead, focus on colours in your food. That means making every meal a rainbow. Whipping up a salad? Add red tomatoes, yellow capsicum, purple beetroot and orange carrots. Having a slice of chocolate cake? Add some colour by throwing some red raspberries and blueberries on the side.

Not only will your food taste better, but you’ll be getting a wider variety of nutrients both macro and micro as well as phytonutrients. If you then combine this with my next tip below, your calorie intake will likely be perfectly in line with what your body needs anyway.

Buffy Ellen Founder of Be Good Organics

Create a rainbow plate
 

Eat the rainbow – when we consume a range of different coloured fruits and vegetables, we are also consuming a greater variety of vitamins, minerals, anti-oxidants and protective phytochemicals (plant chemicals) that promote long-term health and happiness.

For bonus points: add some fat to these veggies to help with the absorption of fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E and K), and to boost the flavour!

Kate Callaghan Holistic Nutritionist and Personal Trainer

Make half of your plate a rainbow of colour with non-starchy vegetables. This automatically ensures a great range of minerals and vitamins, increases your fibre intake and helps improve your satiety levels, all whilst helping to control blood sugars. It's a win-win situation all round!

Caroline Worth Dietitian and Founder of Bitewize Nutrition

12Fill your plate with half veggies

 
Fill your plate with half veggies
 

Every lunch and dinner, fill half your plate with salad or lower-starchy vegies – think broccoli, beans, tomatoes, capsicum, radishes – whatever takes your fancy.

The other half can then be made up of complex carbohydrate and protein-containing foods (e.g. a lovely green tofu curry with brown rice). This is my ultimate tool for helping clients achieve and maintain their optimum weight long term – the antioxidant punch from your increased vegetable intake will be wonderful for your insides too.

Buffy Ellen Founder of Be Good Organics

13Eat your greens

 
Eat your greens
 
Eating green vegetables, particularly those with green leaves, is like eating sunshine. Green vegetables are a good source of antioxidants and contain a number of different vitamins and minerals needed for efficient intrinsic energy production. They're also a good source of non-haem (vegetarian) iron, a critical mineral for effective oxygenation.

Dr. Libby Nutritional Biochemist and Best-selling Author

 
Don't overcomplicate health by getting caught up in the latest superfoods and what the media is saying; its the basics that are important. Eat lots of leafy greens (at least twice a day).

Sunniva Holt Author at The Daily Raw Blog about High Raw Lifestyle

14Nourish your body

 
Nourish your body
 
Make a commitment to view food as nourishment. Many people have a love-hate relationship with food, which is often exacerbated by years of dieting or calorie counting. When you look at a food instead of looking at the caloric value, consider what nutrients it supplies you with and how it will make you feel. Ask yourself the question will this nourish me? before you eat.

Dr. Libby Nutritional Biochemist and Best-selling Author

15Make healthy swaps

 
Make healthy swaps
 
Simple swaps can transform your life in the healthiest way. Its about balance, not deprivation! You can still eat delicious food while being healthy. This is why I love sharing my recipes. Swap white rice for brown rice, milk chocolate for 70-85% dark chocolate, soft drinks for water, vegetable oils for olive oil, processed bread for sourdough or gluten free bread, low fat for full fat.

Natalie Brady Holistic Nutritionist and Health Coach

16Eat a varied diet

 
Eat a varied diet
 

Not only will this prevent food intolerance, but by eating a diverse diet you will gain a diverse gut microbiome. People who have a greater number of different bacterial strains in their body enjoy better health and suffer less disease.

Boosting your good bacteria will ensure you feel better overall –not just physically but mentally and emotionally also. Another simple way you can makeover your gut microbiome is to reduce your intake of red meat and dairy, and follow a primarily plant-based diet. You can potentially turn-around your health within only a few days of making this change.

Lisa Fitzgibbon Naturopath and Medical Herbalist

Eat a diet rich in organic whole foods and plenty of fresh, clean water. This sounds very basic, and in many ways it is, but the old adage that we are what we eat rings very true.

The most important thing you can do for your health is to eat a range of whole, unprocessed foods, in season, as fresh as possible, and as organic as you can afford.

Forget all the labels and fad diets – aim for foods that make you feel great, that are rich in nutrients, and in a variety of flavours and colours. If you eat meat, then include nutrient-rich bone broths and organ meats. Make sure you get plenty of raw fruit and vegetables. And keep your water pure and clean from chemical additives. Think about what your grandparents would have eaten!

Erin Evis Naturopath, Nutritionist and Medical Herbalist

17Eat fermented

 

Enjoy fermented foods, such as sauerkraut, kim-chi, kombucha and full fat plain yoghurt. These are wonderful sources of probiotics, which promote optimal gut health. Research is now proving what we have always known – gut health is the key to whole-body health and wellness.

Try having a tablespoon of sauerkraut with your main meals, some kombucha as a refreshing drink, and perhaps some yoghurt with your breakfast or morning snack.

Kate Callaghan Holistic Nutritionist and Personal Trainer

Eat fermented
 

More and more research is emerging showing the huge role that our microbiome – the collective name for the microbial colonies that make up a huge percentage of our body – play in our wellbeing.

Maintaining a healthy balance of probiotic (good) bacteria is critical for so many functions of our body, fromour digestive health through to our immune and neurological systems, and with each passing month were seeing more information coming out linking an imbalance of these bugs to more and more health conditions.

One of the easiest ways to keep the balance in check – besides avoiding antibiotics, stress, and a sugary, processed food diet – is to eat plenty of fermented foods. Great ones to start with are sauerkraut, kimchi, kefir, and the ever-popular kombucha, but you can branch out to endless varieties of fermented beverages and foods. And the best part is they all taste fantastic, are cheap to make, and a lot of fun too!

Erin Evis Naturopath, Nutritionist and Medical Herbalist

18Avoid processed foods

 

Eat unprocessed, nutrient-dense foods that will stabilise your blood sugar levels.

Focus on eating nutrient dense whole foods that support your health while reducing inflammation and illness. This means eating an abundance of fresh seasonal vegetables, fish, eggs, nuts, seeds, meat, soaked gluten free whole-grains and legumes while avoiding gluten, refined grains, refined sugars and highly processed vegetable oils.

Finding out what types of food you need to thrive is an individual process. We’re all unique. Experiment with different types of wholefoods. Try a meal that is heavier in carbohydrate and see how you feel 2 hours later. Are you hungry? Eat more fat and protein at the next meal and reassess. If you feel sleepy after a meal with a lot of protein, try more carbs.

Ben Warren Nutritionist and Holistic Health Expert, Director at Be Pure

Good health starts with food! Making sure you minimise processed and packaged food is a great start, followed by eliminating refined sugar. It makes sense that we are what we eat –so why would we want to be cheap and full of nasties?

Focusing on fresh, whole foods is important to maintain good health. Lots of fresh vegetables along with sensible amounts of fish, poultry and red meat are the main components of a balanced plate.

Elora Harré Wellness and Lifestyle Blogger

 
Avoid processed foods

19Prepare your own food

 
Prepare your own food
 
The trick to looking after your diet is to be prepared! You have a choice, but you have to commit to it. Put aside time each week to prepare healthy delicious meals. The best time to do this is Sunday afternoons. This will set you up for the week and you can freeze any leftovers you may have for easy lunches.

Natalie Brady Holistic Nutritionist and Health Coach

20Simplify your diet

 
Simplify your diet
 
As far as possible, buy whole foods and eat as nature intended it. Whole foods dont come with numbers on the back of a packet that we dont understand. They dont come with hidden additives, chemicals and a low nutrient value as a result of over-processing. I like to ask myself whether the food I am about to eat is adding value or subtracting from your life.

Amy Crawford Health Coach and Holistic Business Coach

21Go to the supermarket prepared

 
Go to the supermarket prepared
 
Aim to shop the perimeter of the supermarket to avoid the more processed foods which tend to be filled with hidden sugars, salts and preservatives. Write yourself a shopping list, stick to it and never go grocery shopping when you are hungry!

Caroline Worth Dietitian and Founder of Bitewize Nutrition

22Prepare your snacks

 
Prepare your snacks
 
My favorite snacks are celery with some natural nut butter, carrot and cucumber sticks marinated in vinegar pink salt and chilli flakes or a dash of soy. Avocado on rice crackers or rye.

Millie Elder-Holmes Lifestyle Blogger at Clean Eatz NZ

23Take responsibility

 
Take responsibility
 
You cannot eat yourself sick and then drug yourself well. Eat a plant-based wholefood diet built around legumes, vegetables, wholegrains, fruits, seeds and nuts. REMEMBER: The things you need to do to get well are exactly the things you need to do to stay well.

Jason Shon Bennett Health Coach and Best-selling Author

24Chew your food

 
Chew your food
 

Rather than drinking your veggies and fruit (in green smoothies) I encourage you to eat 5–7 handfuls of veggies, and 1–2 handfuls of fruit every day.

I also encourage you to eat a rainbow of fresh veggies and fruit throughout the week and to strike a balance between eating them raw or lightly cooked.

Eating your veggies and fruit not only gives the jaw a good workout but also promotes correct digestive processes. Chewing is a pre-warning to the digestive system that food is coming, causing digestive enzymes and secretions to be activated. Chewing, rather than drinking, also takes longer. This promotes satiety, helping to prevent overeating.

Lisa Fitzgibbon Naturopath and Medical Herbalist

25Drink water

 
Drink water
 

H20 that is! Dehydration symptom includes reduced mental functioning, irritability and loss of concentration. Coffee and some teas are diuretics and the caffeine can cause further stress on the body (oh those poor adrenals), increase blood pressure, anxiety and sleep issues, so limit your intake while increase your water.

Similarly alcohol has a depressant effect the body (brain) and once the buzz wears off can worsen your body, so again, balance out those beverages with aqua. Also remember caffeine and diary can block some nutrients from being absorbed.

Lee Sutherland Professional Health and Nutritional Coach

As a busy mum I know how easy it is to forget entirely about looking after yourself and ensuring that you are drinking enough water. Dehydration can increase fatigue and sugar cravings! Aim to have several glasses of water during the day, start first thing and ensure you have a glass of water 30 minutes before each meal.

Lorraine Scapens Pre and Postnatal Exercise & Wellness Coach

Drink plenty of water (I recommend a minimum 3 litres a day).

Sunniva Holt Author at The Daily Raw Blog about High Raw Lifestyle

26Create a healthy relationship with food

 
Create a healthy relationship with food
 

One of the most complicated and challenging relationships many of us have in our lives, is our relationship with food.

For so many of us, even from our very early years, food was given to us as a reward, a treat for being ‘good’ or behaving well and a way to make us ‘feel better’ when we fell over or had a bad day. Food was also used to keep us quiet, ‘busy’ and because we were ‘lucky’ to have food to eat given that in other parts of the world children starve, finishing everything on your plate was the right thing to do. These habits created in childhood often play out in our adult lives and make it hard to eat well and get in shape, even if technically you ‘know what you need to be doing’. Examining your relationship with food without judgement and finding solutions to your unhelpful habits can be life changing.

Claire Turnbull Qualified Nutritionist

27Reward yourself with 80:20

 
Reward yourself with 80:20
 
My overriding guide for life. Eat healthy plant-based whole foods 80% of the time, and what you do the remaining 20% is up to you. Whether that means having a glass of wine with friends, going out for a romantic dinner, or indulging in a generous slice of the mother-in-laws signature banana cake, that 20% is good for your soul. Your body will respond to what you do 80% of the time, so keep that portion clean and green, and enjoy the rest with a smile on your face – your body and mind will love you for it.

Buffy Ellen Founder of Be Good Organics

Sleep

28Minimise screen time around bed time

 
Minimise screen time around bed time
 

Get a good nights sleep! Our bodies need time to rest and recharge – without it, our bodies become stressed out.

Sleep plays a huge role in every aspect of our health. Studies show that long term sleep deficiency leads to increased risk of chronic disease such as heart disease, kidney disease, obesity, elevated blood pressure and more.

Create a good routine for yourself; minimise screen time around bed and get your body prepared to sleep. The presence of artificial light after sunset makes stress hormones flood the bloodstream leading to elevated stress hormones, sugar cravings, compromised fat metabolism, compromised sleep and diminished energy!

Handy hint: Install a blue light filter, such as flux, on electronic devices to help improve quality of sleep if using devices after sunset.

Elora Harré Wellness and Lifestyle Blogger

29Get enough sleep

 
Get enough sleep
 
It can be difficult in our modern age to ensure we get adequate sleep (Im writing this at 11pm!), but it is so important for the regulation of so many systems of our bodies that we all get a good nights sleep. Aim for a full eight hours, and try to get at least a couple of those before midnight. This will support a healthy metabolism, regulate hormones (including stress hormones), and help maintain a good mood for the rest of the day.

Erin Evis Naturopath, Nutritionist and Medical Herbalist

Early to bed and early to rise is the way to be healthy, wealthy and wise.

Jason Shon Bennett Health Coach and Best-selling Author

Get quality sleep (avoid alcohol and caffeine, go to bed before 10pm and take magnesium and/or valerian before bed).

Sunniva Holt Author at The Daily Raw Blog about High Raw Lifestyle

30Test for zinc deficiency

 
Test for zinc deficiency
 

If you struggle with sleep, test to see if you have a zinc deficiency. Zinc is a key nutrient that helps with sleep. You could also try meditation, chamomile tea, putting your legs up the wall for ten minutes, avoiding technology after 7pm or gentle stretching.

Ben Warren Nutritionist and Holistic Health Expert, Director at Be Pure

Mental health

31Take time out

 
Take time out
 
You are important and you need your time out. You can't give from a depleted source. I suggest that all mums take at least 10 minutes every day to do something they enjoy by themselves. This could be a walk, to sit and read a magazine or to even take a long hot shower.

Lorraine Scapens Pre and Postnatal Exercise & Wellness Coach

32Practice gratitude

 
Practice gratitude
 

Commence a gratitude practise. There is so much research around the power of gratitude and its impact on our immune system, its ability to decrease anxiety and depression, just for a start.

Showing gratitude for what we have in our lives and giving to others raises our vibration and builds abundance. It's as simple as going to bed each night and jotting down 3-5 things you are grateful for.

Amy Crawford Health Coach and Holistic Business Coach

33Rest up

 
Rest up
 

Rest more! Set aside some YOU time. Taking time out for yourself each day whether it is 5 minutes, 15 minutes or half an hour will do wonders for your overall health.

Take a relaxing bath, meditate, go for a stroll around the block, light a candle, read a book, put your legs up against the wall (my personal fav!). This will help your body rest and recuperate so your nervous system will be in the rest and digest response as opposed to the fight or flight response.

Natalie Brady Holistic Nutritionist and Health Coach

34Be mindful

 
Be mindful
 
Invest time and energy into building a positive mindset. What we radiate, we attract – every thought, feeling or belief becomes our reality. That being said, we have the power to turn our reality around! Be very, very aware of your thought patterns and remember to think about that which you do want, not that which you dont.

Amy Crawford Health Coach and Holistic Business Coach

35Find joy in the little things

 
Find joy in the little things
 

Sometimes ‘getting healthy’ can seem like an arduous process. Especially if we try to stick to our wellness regime perfectly. Learning to stop and appreciate the little things in your life that bring you joy will add greatly to your happiness and health overall.

It doesn’t have to be a lot. Start a gratitude practice where you are thankful for three things daily. It could be a warm cup of peppermint tea on a cold day. It could be a hug from your child. It could literally be that you are thankful you had time to be thankful for something!

Learning to appreciate beauty and happiness in and amongst the mundane is a skill that will serve you greatly. Being healthy isn’t about white-knuckling your way through a diet or exercise plan. It’s about living a life that feels happy and enjoyable to you while giving you the energy you need.

Ben Warren Nutritionist and Holistic Health Expert, Director at Be Pure

Achieve your goals

36Look at the whole picture

 
Achieve your goals
 
Get clear on WHAT you want in all areas of your life, not just weight loss (i.e. career, finances, relationships, health, etc) because this impacts the way you think, eat and sleep. Dig deep to understand yourself better and your core values as to WHY you want these things.

Ireene Siniakis Food and Weight Loss Coach

Remember how you eat, drink, move, think, breathe, believe and perceive all impact how you show up each day. Your biochemistry, the nutrients you consume, as well as your beliefs impact whether you experience energy or not. We must give our body what it needs to create the conditions inside of us that allow us to feel energised.

Dr. Libby Nutritional Biochemist and Best-selling Author

37Create a plan

 
Create a plan
 
Devise a plan to get you from where you are now to where you want to be and seek help from an expert coach to guide, support, motivate and make you accountable along the way.

Ireene Siniakis Food and Weight Loss Coach

38Make your social time healthy time

 
Make your social time healthy time
 
Getting motivated with exercise and healthy habits is always a lot more fun with friends. Don’t assume that none of your friends want to work out or change some eating habits too -- you may find one who wants to get in shape alongside you.

Lee-Anne Wann Health & Fitness Consultant

39Get accountable

 
Get accountable
 

Find an accountability system that works for you. Accountability is great. Different strokes for different folks however, and one persons inspiration is another individuals nightmare. So do what works for you.

Maybe its committing to compete in a sports event. Maybe its joining a team challenge at the gym where your results are aggregated so you dont want to let anyone else down. Maybe its getting three colleagues to commit to a walk around the block at lunchtime three days a week.

You are smart: figure out a structure that keeps you accountable and motivated when the days are dark and summer seems a long way off.

Louise Thompson Life Coach, Yoga Teacher and Blogger

40Build good habits

 
Build good habits
 

Replace a bad habit with a good habit, one at a time. Its easier to stick at a new healthy habit if you replace a bad habit with a good one, rather than just trying to stop a bad one.

By substituting a more positive habit rather than just depriving yourself of something you like, you are far more likely to keep the habit up.

So, stop having that glass of wine when you come in from work by driving home a different way and have a walk on the beach on the way. Make the post-work walk the new habit. Or give up the traditional Thursday Takeout Binge-fest by instituting a Healthy Night once a week where you and your partner take it in turns to cook a new healthy recipe. Or break the habit of reaching straight for the cheese and crackers by making that the time you Facetime people you never have time to catch up with.

Creating positive, healthy rituals that crowd out bad habits is much more successful than just trying to stop doing something you secretly actually get a lot of pleasure from.

Louise Thompson Life Coach, Yoga Teacher and Blogger

41Make a happy habit, not an effort of willpower

 
Make a happy habit, not an effort of willpower
 

Willpower is a finite resource. Sooner or later it will run out. Fact! So if you are relying only on willpower to get you to the gym or to drag out the juicer, then eventually you are bound to fall off the wagon.

Far better to focus on what naturally pulls you forward rather than what you have to force yourself to do. That means choosing exercise that you genuinely LOVE. Food that you actually ENJOY. The less effort required the better, and the key to that is choosing what really feels sincerely delicious and fun for you.

Louise Thompson Life Coach, Yoga Teacher and Blogger

Did you love these top health tips? We’ve got plenty more on health and well-being advice on the HealthPost blog. Or if you’re after superfoods, supplements or other quality health products, shop online with HealthPost today.

Author Bios

 
Dr Libby

Dr Libby

Dr Libby (PhD) is one of Australasia's leading nutritional biochemists. She's also a best-selling author and speaker. She lives in New Zealand and Australia.

 

Jason Shon Bennett

Jason Shon Bennett is a self-cured international health researcher, health coach, best-selling author, and speaker who inspires and educates people all over the world.

Jason Shon Bennett
 

Elora Harre

Elora Harré

Elora Harré is a wellness and lifestyle blogger, as well as a weight loss and health mentor. She documented her journey to losing 55kg on her blog. She regularly posts daily recipes, tips, information and motivation.

 

Lisa Fitzgibbon

Lisa Fitzgibbon is a naturopath and medical herbalist who has been in the natural health industry for nearly a decade. She gives advice on her blog Lisa Said So as well as running her own practice OOMPH–Realistic Holistic Health.

Lisa Fitzgibbon
 

Natalie Brady

Natalie Brady

Natalie Brady is a qualified holistic nutritionist and health coach. As a clinical nutritionist and health coach she helps her clients by giving them the tools, guidance and knowledge to achieve optimum health. When she’s not doing that, she’s sharing nutrition and wellness advice and healthy recipes on her blog.

 

Kate Callaghan

Kate Callaghan is a holistic nutritionist and personal trainer who is passionate about promoting optimal health and happiness through nutrition and fitness on her blog The Holistic Nutritionist. She is the author of Holistic Nutrition: Eat Well, Train Smart &amp Be Kind to Your Body.

Kate Callaghan
 

Amy Crawford

Amy Crawford

Amy Crawford is a certified health coach and a holistic business coach. Her website, The Holistic Ingredient, is an online wellness hub, a go to destination for all things whole foods, clean living and positivity.

 

Ana Davis

Ana Davis is Director and Founder of Bliss Baby Yoga, a specialised yoga teacher training organisation that offers prenatal, postnatal, restorative yoga and women's yoga teacher courses online and across the world.

Ana Davis
 

Buffy Ellen

Buffy Ellen

Buffy Ellen is the founder of Be Good Organics, a plant-based wholefoods blog, store and community. Buffy is currently completing a degree in Nutrition and Naturopathy.

 

Erin Evis

Erin Evis is a naturopath, nutritionist and medical herbalist at Apothecare Natural Health, and founder of popular fermented food network Fermenting Freaks Forever! New Zealand.

Erin Evis
 

Sunniva Holt

Sunniva Holt

Sunniva Holt is a serial entrepreneur, best-selling author, speaker and coach. On her blog The Daily Raw, she documents her high raw lifestyle, providing recipes and inspiration for those interested in a whole foods, plant-based diet.

 

Ireene Siniakis

Ireene Siniakis is a food and weight loss coach specialising in the health and wellbeing of corporate women seeking to lose weight and get back into shape.

Ireene Siniakis
 

Lorraine Scapens

Lorraine Scapens

Lorraine Scapens has been in the fitness industry for 25 years. She specializes in Pre and Postnatal Exercise and Wellness. Her website Pregnancyexercise.co.nz helps mums around the world get into shape.

 

Louise Thompson

Louise Thompson is a corporate escapee turned wellbeing pro. She is a national newspaper columnist and a qualified yoga teacher with her own yoga studio Positive Balance. She posts wellbeing advice on her weekly blog Wellbeing Wednesday.

Louise Thompson
 

Caroline Worth

Caroline Worth

Caroline Worth is the founder of Bitewize Nutrition and has been helping individuals realise their lifestyle and sporting dreams for the past 3 years. As a registered dietitian, Caroline offers an evidence based approach.

 

Ben Warren

Ben Warren is one of New Zealand's leading nutritionists and holistic health experts. He is also the founder and clinical director of BePure. His mission is to build the future of personalised health, by empowering and educating on the importance of nutrition and healthy lifestyle.

Ben Warren
 

Lee-Anne Wann

Lee-Anne Wann

Lee-Anne Wann is a Health and Fitness Consultant and a Performance Nutritionist. Lee-Anne currently runs a private medicine and health practice, and is the team nutritionist for the Vodafone Warriors NRL team.

 

Hayley Roper

As a Professional Trainer and blogger at Love My Body, Hayley Roper aims to empower women to feel their best, through the practise of good nutrition and the right exercise for our bodies.

Hayley Roper
 

Lee Sutherland

Lee Sutherland

Lee Sutherland is a health & fitness expert and director at Fitness In The City. As a Mum (with another on the way) she knows a thing or two about staying healthy and leading a nourished life while living a full busy life.

 

Amanda

Amanda encompasses all things health and fitness, including delicious healthy recipes and simple no equipment workout at her blog Move Love Eat. She is a Personal Trainer, Bootcamp Instructor and NZ Record holder in Powerlifting.

Amanda Move Love Eat
 

Millie Elder-Holmes

Millie Elder-Holmes

Millie is a lifestyle blogger at Clean Eatz NZ. She loves all things that nourish the mind, body and soul. She believes strongly in self-love, and likes to express that through food and living consciously.

 

Dani Stevens

Dani Stevens is a 365 Lifestyle Motivator, who showcases the right balance for a healthy, fit regime and happy lifestyle. Her injection of positive vibes on DaniStevens.com have inspired so many peple to a healthier, happier lifestyle.

Dani Stevens
 

Claire Turnbull

Claire Turnbull

Claire Turnbull is a Qualified nutritionist with over 14 years experience helping people to live healthier lives and create a healthier relationship with food. She is the nutritionist for Healthy Food Guide magazine and also runs the nutrition practice Mission Nutrition.

 

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